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Posts tagged africa


Photoset

Apr 20, 2014
@ 2:49 am
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archdrude:

The Amazing Connections Between the Inca and Egyptian Cultures 

"The ancient Egyptians (in Africa) and the ancient pre-Incas/Incas (in South America) evolved on opposite sides of the globe and were never in contact.

Yet, both cultures mysteriously possessed the same strikingly identical body of ancient art, architecture, symbolism, mythology and religion.

The Victorian era scholars, faced with this enigma, concluded that both cultures must have been children of the same Golden Age parent civilization, “Atlantis.”

Today, Egyptian/Inca parallels are not only being ignored by American and Western scholars, they’re being suppressed.

Many baffling and unsolved similarities link the ancient Egyptians and the ancient pre-Incas/Incas ― even though both cultures evolved on opposite sides of the planet, separated by oceans” Read More

(via designeronanisland)


Photo

Apr 19, 2014
@ 5:35 pm
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daghanaianchiq:

Richard Terborg 

daghanaianchiq:

Richard Terborg 

(via accradotalt)


Link

Apr 17, 2014
@ 11:34 pm
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Watch: Short documentary on Lagos performance artist Jelili Atiku »


Photo

Apr 17, 2014
@ 11:22 pm
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424 notes

dianeaudreyngako:

On the Fly, T A K E Y O U R E T H N I C I T Y.
Picture taken at Le Comptoir General, Paris

 

dianeaudreyngako:

On the Fly, T A K E Y O U R E T H N I C I T Y.

Picture taken at Le Comptoir General, Paris

 

(via studioafrica)


Photoset

Apr 17, 2014
@ 11:21 pm
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493 notes

dynamicafrica:

In Photos: “Becoming South Sudan” by Alinka Echeverria (2011).

It’s been a little over three years since the four million voters from Africa’s youngest country voted in a referendum to secede from Sudan and create the Republic of South Sudan. January 9th, 2011, was the day that changed everything, the day history was made and the day the world’s 193rd nation was birthed. Exactly six months later on July 9th, 2011, South Sudan officially became a sovereign and independent nation.

However, less than five years later the country has found itself in an ongoing conflict as fighting between government forces and rebel armies (chiefly the Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Movement - SPLM) continue to take place over resources and territory. Today, April 15th, marks exactly four months since the beginning of South Sudan’s current civil war. The war has so far displaced more than a million and killed over 10,000. UNICEF warns that the South Sudan conflict and famine could kill 50,000 children within months.

Read more about this photo series.


Photo

Apr 15, 2014
@ 10:22 am
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768 notes

holaafrica:

We gained independence from colonialism but we now need to gain independence from these predators that look, believe & sound just like us. 
We will only be free once we are free from inequality.

descendants-of-brown-royalty:

Here is a list of nations as they gained their independence. 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_date_of_nationhood

holaafrica:

We gained independence from colonialism but we now need to gain independence from these predators that look, believe & sound just like us.

We will only be free once we are free from inequality.

descendants-of-brown-royalty:

Here is a list of nations as they gained their independence. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_date_of_nationhood


Link

Apr 5, 2014
@ 1:29 pm
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Ugandan Rev. faces prison for refusing to hate »

Uganda made international headlines when President Yoweri Museveni signed Uganda’s “Kill the Gays” Act into law, jailing people for 14 years to life for loving someone of the same sex and leading to massive spikes in hate crime violence.

But one Reverend in the country is generating press for a different reason: hosting prayer sessions and counseling services even as he, too, faces prison for refusing to discriminate.

Rev. Christopher Senyonjo had already been cut from Uganda’s Anglican Church for calling on religious leaders to embrace LGBT people instead of encouraging hate and violence. Now his activism threatens to put him behind bars, too — unless we drawn the attention of the international community to his fight.

Uganda has already lost millions in global aid because of its hate policies.If enough of us stand behind Rev. Senyonjo, we can keep him out of prison and help him stay an ally and powerful voice against homophobia in Uganda. 

Will you join us in sending a message of thanks and support to Rev. Senyonjo, and a warning to President Museveni?

PETITION TO PRESIDENT MUSEVENI: We stand behind Rev. Christopher Senyonjo in embracing love and community over hatred and violence. Listen to his pleas for tolerance, and don’t imprison him for standing up for the LGBT community!


Video

Mar 28, 2014
@ 1:21 pm
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210 notes

studioafrica:

The Supreme Price | dir. Joanna Lipper

The Supreme Price is a feature length documentary film produced and directed by Joanna Lipper coming soon to cinemas everywhere.

The film traces the evolution of the Pro-Democracy Movement in Nigeria and efforts to increase the participation of women in leadership roles.

Following the annulment of her father’s victory in Nigeria’s Presidential Election and her mother’s assassination by agents of the military dictatorship, Hafsat Abiola faces the challenge of transforming a corrupt culture of governance into a democracy capable of serving Nigeria’s most marginalized population: women. 

More here

(via blackfilm)


Photo

Mar 20, 2014
@ 2:43 pm
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Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie discusses AMERICANAH, fashion, feminism, and her bold stance against Nigeria’s anti-gay laws with Michel Martin of NPR’s Tell Me More. (NPR)
“‘I wrote it because I was angry. I was upset. It was very personal, my reaction to it. And you know, it’s easy to say, ‘I have people I love who are gay,’ which is true, but if I didn’t, I would still have been outraged by it, because I felt it was deeply unjust. And I recognize that I have a voice now in Nigeria, and so I wanted to write it, and I wanted to write it specifically for a Nigerian audience, to say, ‘let’s actually think about this, let’s talk about this.’ And the responses I got, I wasn’t surprised to get … people who said I used to love you but now that I know you support gays, I no longer love you. And when somebody told me this, that this is what her cousin had said, I said, ‘tell your cousin I don’t want her love, if that’s the condition for her love.’”
 

http://www.npr.org/2014/03/18/291133080/news-maker

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie discusses AMERICANAH, fashion, feminism, and her bold stance against Nigeria’s anti-gay laws with Michel Martin of NPR’s Tell Me More. (NPR)

“‘I wrote it because I was angry. I was upset. It was very personal, my reaction to it. And you know, it’s easy to say, ‘I have people I love who are gay,’ which is true, but if I didn’t, I would still have been outraged by it, because I felt it was deeply unjust. And I recognize that I have a voice now in Nigeria, and so I wanted to write it, and I wanted to write it specifically for a Nigerian audience, to say, ‘let’s actually think about this, let’s talk about this.’ And the responses I got, I wasn’t surprised to get … people who said I used to love you but now that I know you support gays, I no longer love you. And when somebody told me this, that this is what her cousin had said, I said, ‘tell your cousin I don’t want her love, if that’s the condition for her love.’”

 

http://www.npr.org/2014/03/18/291133080/news-maker


Video

Mar 20, 2014
@ 2:24 pm
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3 notes

it was amazing and insightful to be at this conversation yesterday with these two phenomenal people. check out the video- between the lines-  of chimamanda and zadie smith at the  if you missed it.

http://shine.forharriet.com/2014/03/watch-zadie-smith-and-chimamanda.html