i am Naija through and through. Naija born. i am queer or same-gender-loving. i am an artist, filmmaker, performer and organizer. i am gender non-conforming.
i am free and the light!

feel free to ask me a question or submit some inspiring materials (naijaboi.tumblr.com/submit)

peace seyi!


Video

Mar 28, 2014
@ 1:21 pm
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210 notes

studioafrica:

The Supreme Price | dir. Joanna Lipper

The Supreme Price is a feature length documentary film produced and directed by Joanna Lipper coming soon to cinemas everywhere.

The film traces the evolution of the Pro-Democracy Movement in Nigeria and efforts to increase the participation of women in leadership roles.

Following the annulment of her father’s victory in Nigeria’s Presidential Election and her mother’s assassination by agents of the military dictatorship, Hafsat Abiola faces the challenge of transforming a corrupt culture of governance into a democracy capable of serving Nigeria’s most marginalized population: women. 

More here

(via blackfilm)


Chat

Mar 28, 2014
@ 3:47 am
Permalink
205,601 notes

21 People On What They Would Tell Their 19-Year-Old Selves

Jonathan, 55: There is no such thing as “the only one”. You will meet lots of “the ones”. Only commit when the timing is right for the both of you – that can take years for some, and that’s okay.

Miranda, 24: Drop pre-med.

Isaac, 48: Deodorant does not count as a shower, and that haircut only looked good on Bon Jovi.

Anya, 42: Make the conscious decision to be happy, and then stick with it. Society will do everything in its power to convince you that your personal happiness is dependent on something external – beauty, success, wealth, etc. – it isn’t.

Parker, 55: 60% of the things you think are important now won’t matter a whit to you by the time you reach 50. The trick is to figure out the important 40% and work it.

Megan, 34: He doesn’t love you, and you will be okay.

Peter, 58: Don’t let anything stand in your way of taking part (or all) of your junior year abroad. You’ll never again have quite the same opportunity to experience a foreign land, for an extended period of time, in your youth. It is destined to be one of the most memorable aspects of your life.

Eleanor, 67: Talk less. Listen more.

Donald, 27: There’s a huge difference between who you want to be and who everyone around you wants you to be. Figure out which is which.

Camille, 56: Always remember: when falling off a horse, pull your tongue in.

Jackson, 57: No one knows anything for sure. They’re all just doing the best they can with what they have, just like you.

Vicki, 47: You’ll never have all the answers, so make every question count.

Donald, 38: You don’t have to grow up to be the dad you never had.

Katelyn, 30: Make the most out of college. You will never again be at a place where your only goal is to learn. Learn a lot, learn often, and learn with reckless abandon.

Joshua, 55: Women love to laugh.

Annabelle, 38: Drugs are not beautiful, glamorous or opulent. They are not a remedy, a solution, a cure-all, or a cure-anything.

Colin, 50: You miss so much life when you sleep until 3 PM. Wake up to see sunrises; they are the most stunning of nature’s masterpieces.

Eleanor, 26: Eating two pints of ice cream won’t make you happy. Neither will sprinting 10 miles. Be nice to yourself.

Aaron, 52: Don’t forget to ask that girl in the Oberlin library what kind of perfume she’s wearing. You’ll buy it for her in 20 years.

Scarlett, 54: Don’t be afraid to be yourself. Those that get you will love you, those that don’t, well, their loss. Just remember: Wherever you are, it’s a party.

Zack, 9: I hope you’re awesome. And be nice to girls.


Photo

Mar 20, 2014
@ 2:43 pm
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18 notes

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie discusses AMERICANAH, fashion, feminism, and her bold stance against Nigeria’s anti-gay laws with Michel Martin of NPR’s Tell Me More. (NPR)
“‘I wrote it because I was angry. I was upset. It was very personal, my reaction to it. And you know, it’s easy to say, ‘I have people I love who are gay,’ which is true, but if I didn’t, I would still have been outraged by it, because I felt it was deeply unjust. And I recognize that I have a voice now in Nigeria, and so I wanted to write it, and I wanted to write it specifically for a Nigerian audience, to say, ‘let’s actually think about this, let’s talk about this.’ And the responses I got, I wasn’t surprised to get … people who said I used to love you but now that I know you support gays, I no longer love you. And when somebody told me this, that this is what her cousin had said, I said, ‘tell your cousin I don’t want her love, if that’s the condition for her love.’”
 

http://www.npr.org/2014/03/18/291133080/news-maker

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie discusses AMERICANAH, fashion, feminism, and her bold stance against Nigeria’s anti-gay laws with Michel Martin of NPR’s Tell Me More. (NPR)

“‘I wrote it because I was angry. I was upset. It was very personal, my reaction to it. And you know, it’s easy to say, ‘I have people I love who are gay,’ which is true, but if I didn’t, I would still have been outraged by it, because I felt it was deeply unjust. And I recognize that I have a voice now in Nigeria, and so I wanted to write it, and I wanted to write it specifically for a Nigerian audience, to say, ‘let’s actually think about this, let’s talk about this.’ And the responses I got, I wasn’t surprised to get … people who said I used to love you but now that I know you support gays, I no longer love you. And when somebody told me this, that this is what her cousin had said, I said, ‘tell your cousin I don’t want her love, if that’s the condition for her love.’”

 

http://www.npr.org/2014/03/18/291133080/news-maker


Video

Mar 20, 2014
@ 2:24 pm
Permalink
3 notes

it was amazing and insightful to be at this conversation yesterday with these two phenomenal people. check out the video- between the lines-  of chimamanda and zadie smith at the  if you missed it.

http://shine.forharriet.com/2014/03/watch-zadie-smith-and-chimamanda.html


Photo

Mar 18, 2014
@ 1:26 pm
Permalink
90 notes

w-oman-and-m-achine:

Things that programmers know that most people do not:
Digital content can never be moved, only copied.
You can never watch or listen to anything on the internet without having it copied to your computer first.
You cannot password protect a computer from someone who has physical access to it, only encryption works.
When you empty the trashcan, the files are not deleted.
When you format your hard drive, the files are not deleted.
Murphy was right.
Your desktop computer can run advanced programs for free that used to be available only to big companies for $100,000. Like Unix, virtual machines and SQL servers.
The Cloud simply means someone else’s computer.
That Office documents are actually ZIP files.

w-oman-and-m-achine:

Things that programmers know that most people do not:

  • Digital content can never be moved, only copied.
  • You can never watch or listen to anything on the internet without having it copied to your computer first.
  • You cannot password protect a computer from someone who has physical access to it, only encryption works.
  • When you empty the trashcan, the files are not deleted.
  • When you format your hard drive, the files are not deleted.
  • Murphy was right.
  • Your desktop computer can run advanced programs for free that used to be available only to big companies for $100,000. Like Unix, virtual machines and SQL servers.
  • The Cloud simply means someone else’s computer.
  • That Office documents are actually ZIP files.

(Source: danieleverett, via accradotalt)


Video

Mar 18, 2014
@ 1:23 pm
Permalink
1 note

Slow by Darius Clark Monroe

Logline: 26yo, DDF, 5’ 11”, 185 fit. 7 cut. Vers. Looking to host now. 420 is cool. Send a face pic.

Starring Carlton Byrd and Harvey Gardner Moore

—-

what would you do?


Link

Mar 18, 2014
@ 1:20 pm
Permalink
40,042 notes

artist tips »

thefrogman:

suchirolle:

rileyav:

don’t save as jpeg

as a former yearbook editor and designer, let me explain this further

if youre only planning on posting your art online, them please save it as .png ;this is also better for transparencies as well

BUT

please, if youre…

This post has about 30,000 notes and a lot of back and forth on what you should and shouldn’t do. Part of this is because there is a lot of personal preference when it comes to printing. People like to work with different formats and equipment because that is what they learned on. They achieve basically the same things through different methods and much like Mac/PC… there is much debate.

I don’t have a degree in anything but maybe I can clear a few things up.

First of all, if you are printing things yourself, there is no reason to convert your photoshop or illustrator document to anything else before printing. So keeping it a PSD or AI file is fine. If you are having someone else print your document, ask them how they prefer the file to be formatted. They will choose the best option for their experience and equipment.

Keep in mind you will get sharper prints if you adjust your document’s pixels per inch to match the printer. Epsons are 360ppi. Most other manufacturers are 300ppi. Sometimes people erroneously refer to this as dpi, so just be aware of that.

I wrote a more detailed post on how big you should make your art here.

On file formats…

JPEG - This compresses your image to make the file size smaller. This can cause quality loss because it is basically throwing away data. This is especially hard on text, graphics, and simpler artwork. Fine lines can get jagged and pixelated during the compression process. However, photos and photo-realistic art will look just fine. 

That means JPEGs are ideal for posting photographs or highly detailed artwork online. They are compatible with all browsers and will load much faster for people with slow connections. At the sizes people view JPEGs on the web, it will be hard to see the loss of quality.

As long as the resolution is good and the compression is minimal, you can still get nice prints from a jpeg, but it is not ideal.

TIFF - This is basically a super JPEG. It has no compression and is compatible with most image editors. It handles colors well and prints nicely. Due to its robust compatibility, most printers can handle TIFFs with no worries. If I had to save a file into a flattened format, TIFF is probably my choice. The disadvantage is that the file sizes can be very large and you cannot publish TIFFs online in very many places. 

PNG - These are typically used for web-based graphic design or simple artwork. They are compatible with all browsers and allow you to preserve transparency. They also render text and fine lines much better than JPEGs. If you were posting more cartoon-like artwork online or something very graphical (charts and graphs) this would be a good option. File sizes can get big with more complicated images. I don’t recommend saving photos or photo-realistic artwork as PNGs.

In my experience I have found that color rendering with PNGs is a bit unreliable, so I would probably avoid this format for printing purposes. 

PDF - This is basically a container. You can throw whatever you want into a PDF. It will maintain the quality of the images you put inside it. PDFs are great for multi-page documents. Especially if they are a mix of graphics, art, text, and photos. If you don’t have experience using publishing software like InDesign, this is a good alternative for these types of jobs. If you only have one page to print, I’m not sure it is worth the trouble of making it a PDF. 

RGB vs CMYK 
I recommend always starting your document in the RGB colorspace and converting it later only if needed. It is rare that you do not publish on the web, and RGB is much more suited for that. Converting from RGB to CMYK is much easier than the other way around. 

If you are printing yourself, you are probably using an inkjet. Modern inkjets do great RGB conversion and in some cases will handle it better than CMYK. You can try both formats, but in the end you will just have to accept the fact that nothing you can do will get you a perfect color match. The goal is to get a good print. View it and judge it independently of what is on your screen. Do not drive yourself mad trying to get them to match perfectly. 

If you are having someone else print your work, again, ask them what they prefer. If they have large offset printers, they may ask for CMYK. If they have inkjets, they may just want RGB files. If this is a very large printing operation, your printer should want to do any color conversions themselves. If they do not, I might suggest looking for a different printer.

I hope that is helpful. Happy printing.


Photoset

Mar 15, 2014
@ 4:10 am
Permalink
266,717 notes

(Source: belleresources, via i-am-b-east)


Text

Mar 14, 2014
@ 6:53 pm
Permalink
8 notes

How to Create a Performing Arts Video Work Sample (Part 1 of 3): Your Video Is an Artifact

nyfacurrent:

image

Questions to ask: How’s it watched? What’s it for?

A video work sample is a tool you should probably have if you create work in the performing arts. Many grant applications and festival submissions require it, or even if they don’t, your application still may need one in order to be competitive. Take a look at the choreographers, theater and performance artists who are getting funded and programmed, and you’ll see that they have video: probably lots of it, probably well filmed.

Read More


Photoset

Mar 14, 2014
@ 3:39 am
Permalink
4,632 notes

beharie-nyongo:

divalocity:

The Bold & The Beautiful: Actresses Danai Gurira & Lupita Nyong’o

Photos: Byron Purvis

image

image

(via note-a-bear)